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    Acount executive I Communication
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Our Values

Ambition
We are creating something worth creating, that will endure the test of time. We do this by relentlessly focusing on the success of our employees and customers. We’re grounded by humility and driven by ambition and expect our employees to be too.
a
Make It Fun
We believe in celebrating our successes, milestones and hard work, through recognition, appreciation and rewards
m
Passion For Learning
We want to be at the forefront of change and growth; there is always something we can learn.
p
Live The Golden Rule
We are empathetic and respectful of each other, customers and the communities we serve. We value, encourage and celebrate the gifts in one another and respect the inherent dignity and worth of every individual.
l
Integrity
We believe in honesty, openness, trust, respect and reliability in all that we do.
i
Focused Teams
Working together on a project is more important than who gets credit. We put trust in our teams and watch the incredible accomplishments happen when ego takes a backseat.
f
You Are Unique
We know it takes people with different ideas, strengths, interests, and cultural backgrounds to help us succeed.
y
Investing In Our Employees
“We train our people well enough so they can leave, treat them well enough so they don’t want to” (Richard Branson)
i
Transparency
We are honest about the actions we are taking, being upfront and visible.
t

our values

  • a

    Ambition

    We are creating something worth creating, that will endure the test of time. We do this by relentlessly focusing on the success of our employees and customers. We’re grounded by humility and driven by ambition and expect our employees to be too.
  • m

    Make It Fun

    We believe in celebrating our successes, milestones and hard work, through recognition, appreciation and rewards
  • p

    Passion For Learning

    We want to be at the forefront of change and growth; there is always something we can learn.
  • l

    Live The Golden Rule

    We are empathetic and respectful of each other, customers and the communities we serve. We value, encourage and celebrate the gifts in one another and respect the inherent dignity and worth of every individual.
  • i

    Integrity

    We believe in honesty, openness, trust, respect and reliability in all that we do.
  • f

    Focused Teams

    Working together on a project is more important than who gets credit. We put trust in our teams and watch the incredible accomplishments happen when ego takes a backseat.
  • y

    You Are Unique

    We know it takes people with different ideas, strengths, interests, and cultural backgrounds to help us succeed.
  • i

    Investing In Our Employees

    “We train our people well enough so they can leave, treat them well enough so they don’t want to” (Richard Branson)
  • t

    Transparency

    We are honest about the actions we are taking, being upfront and visible.

Lorem Ipsum

Lighting as Part of A Low Vision Evaluation
[embed]https://youtu.be/C55MVjRmrCw[/embed] A low vision evaluation is in some ways similar to a regular eye exam, and in other ways entirely different. During a low vision evaluation our residency trained low vision optometrist will assess the complete functioning of the visual system while also helping the patient understand more about their condition and the variety of tools to improve their remaining vision and improve their quality of life. For example lighting plays an important role in the lives of people who suffer from low vision. Proper lighting allows them to do their everyday activities without any problems. Therefore, helping the patient understand the importance and tools to improve lighting is a part of a low vision evaluation. This is one example that illustrates how different a low vision evaluation is from a typical eye exam. 

What is low vision?

Low vision is exactly what it sounds like. The condition makes it difficult to do everyday tasks, including deciphering colors, reading, driving, and recognizing people. Glasses, surgery, or medication cannot correct or reverse low vision. However, you can overcome it with the help of assistive devices, enhanced lighting, and therapy that enables you to continue to enjoy activities you once thought were impossible.

Are you experiencing low vision?

You may need to see a low vision optometrist such as Dr. Sarah Wolff if you experience any of these symptoms and are not able to improve them through standard solutions such as glasses or contact lenses.
  • Having trouble seeing things directly through your center of vision
  • Difficulty adjusting to contrasting colors
  • Decreased peripheral vision
  • Night vision problems
  • Blurry or fuzzy vision
  • Sensitivity to glare
  • Difficulty adjusting your vision when you move from indoors to outdoors and vice versa

How is lighting discussed in a low vision evaluation?

Dr. Wolff's low vision evaluations cater to each individual's needs. She explains what type of lighting is required for the tasks they're doing. If you have one eye that sees slightly better than the other, ideally, you want the light to come from that side, since that is where your best vision is. You also don't want the lighting to come from above and cast shadows or glare. That light should be focused on the tasks you're looking at so it enhances without actually causing glare.  Even just the lighting around your home can make a big difference. In order to avoid constantly bringing in additional lighting, you should improve lighting around your house.

What role does a low vision doctor play in modifying lighting? 

Low vision optometrist Dr. Wolff demonstrates different lighting conditions in the office to her patients. The goal is to educate people to show how much difference lighting can make. As a result, patients can better understand and assess the lighting conditions in different rooms at home once they return home. Her job also includes connecting people to other resources, whether it's someone coming to their home or even setting up a Zoom call to talk about their home's lighting. She focuses on task lamps and floor lamps in the office since they are easier to transfer to the home. She also shows the patients magnification options that include lighting in them and demonstrates to the patient how lighting improves the ability to use magnification. 

Schedule a low vision evaluation in Los Angeles

Low vision aids and good lighting may benefit your loved one if they have trouble going about their daily activities. Our Los Angeles Low Vision clinic is under the leadership of residency trained low vision optometrist, Dr. Sarah Wolff.  If you are interested in scheduling a low vision exam, please call [mbv name="token-practice-phone"]. 
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Can ADD/ADHD be a Vision Problem?
[embed]https://youtu.be/lxEBk4PR_Hs[/embed] According to a study, approximately 20% of 4.5 million children currently identified as having ADHD may have been misdiagnosed. Furthermore some researchers point to a major disparity between rates of ADHD in the US vs Europe to indicate that the US may potentially be misdiagnosing some cases of ADHD.  Many of the symptoms associated with ADD and ADHD can overlap with those associated with vision problems, and it is now well known that the two disorders can occur together. One of the common vision disorders that is often misdiagnosed as ADHD is convergence insufficiency, which makes it difficult for a child to do near work such as reading or writing. According to a meta analysis the rate of convergence insufficiency in school-age children documented in the scientific studies ranges from 2% to 13%, with the most common figure cited in these studies around 5%. 

Why is ADHD often misdiagnosed?

In recent years, ADHD has been classified as part of the autism spectrum. The majority of these individuals will have a behavioural problem. In the early days, ADHD was primarily diagnosed through a questionnaire given to parents and teachers. Rather than using clinical tests to diagnose ADHD, a questionnaire was used, and patients were given stimulant trials to see if the treatment was effective, which is not exactly the best way to diagnose it. In fact, it is possible and what is often neglected that ADHD is misdiagnosed when there is more of a visual processing deficit that can be easily addressed through vision therapy.

Why are undiagnosed vision problems sometimes misidentified as ADHD?

Imagine a child who has difficulty seeing things up close. They may have trouble sitting still while reading or doing school work. They may lack attention in the classroom since they anyway feel that they are “not smart enough”. These are just two simple examples that illustrate why a child with a vision disorder will oftentimes exhibit many of the same symptoms as ADHD. Because these vision conditions are so common (with some estimates showing that 15% or more of school aged children have a visual disturbance that impacts their ability to read), it is crucial for parents that suspect ADHD to have their child's vision tested by a developmental or behavioural optometrist. 

Which vision condition is most commonly associated with ADHD?

Convergence insufficiency is the most common vision problem associated with ADHD. In convergence insufficiency, the eyes cannot focus together properly on close tasks, leading to symptoms such as blurry or double vision, slow reading, or eye irritation.  Recent research has found that children with ADHD have three times the risk of having convergence insufficiency. It is unclear whether ADHD and convergence insufficiency have a direct connection, or if ADHD diagnoses are more common because convergence insufficiency is less well known, and therefore many children are mistakenly diagnosed with ADHD.

Schedule an appointment at Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach

Identifying the difference between attention disorders and similar behaviours caused by vision problems is crucial, and can help save your child from incorrect diagnosis. Having years of experience as optometrists, they can determine whether your child has functional vision problems that should be addressed. We provide customised vision therapy for our young patients at Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach. Call us at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] if you would like to schedule a developmental eye exam.
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Are all magnifiers the same? The difference in optics between handheld magnifiers
[embed]https://youtu.be/BQNItuIMesQ[/embed] Hand magnifiers are hand-held devices that can be placed over an object or text to enlarge or magnify what you see. Many people think that the only thing that matters is the amount of magnification, and that buying a cheap magnifying device at the drugstore is the same as buying a high quality device sold by reputable low vision device companies. In this blog we will explain why getting the best optics makes a massive difference in visual clarity. 

Do optics matter in handheld magnifiers?

Optics make a bigger difference than size in smaller handheld magnifying devices. Therefore, if your device doesn't have good quality, even though it has more magnification, you might not get the best image. When the size of the magnifier is smaller, the working distance is much shorter. As the field of view of the lens increases, you are able to see more words at once, which is great when you are trying to make sense of a map, picture, or column of information.  A practitioner should prescribe a magnifier that provides adequate vision for patient reading tasks while maintaining a wide view field.

Are handheld magnifiers equipped with lights?

Lighting plays a huge role in the lives of low vision patients. Nowadays, most handheld magnifiers come with integrated LED lights. The quality of light used in LEDs is so much better than lights that were used in the past. There are different color temperatures in handheld magnifiers, which may be beneficial to patients suffering from specific eye conditions.

When buying a magnifier, why is it important to consult with a low vision optometrist?

Buying a magnifier from a drugstore, without seeing an optometrist, may not give you clear vision. It might have a huge magnification, but it is not effective for low vision such as being distorted or not providing the right field of view. Pages magnifiers do two times magnification, but you can't really read what you are trying to read because the image is blurry due to the way they use that magnification to create that larger visual area. Everyone wants more magnification and feels that it would be beneficial, but it doesn't always work, especially if the optical quality isn't good.

Schedule an appointment

To learn more about handheld magnifiers or if you are uncomfortable with the one you have, please schedule an appointment with our residency trained low vision optometrist by calling [mbv name="token-practice-phone"].
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How to help someone who is visually impaired
[embed]https://youtu.be/axYSwgvNyAg[/embed] Vision impairment affects approximately 12 million Americans over 40 years of age. Whenever our low vision optometrist Dr. Wolff sees a patient suffering from low vision, she encourages them to bring family members along, typically a spouse or someone who will be taking care of them. Because it is something that patients and their families go through together when one member of the family loses vision.

What is an example of a way a family member can support and help a loved one who has vision loss?

When someone comes in with peripheral vision loss on one side from a stroke, Dr. Wolff educates the spouse, family members, or caregivers, to present objects to the patient from the side where the patient can't see very well. What this does is to challenge them as well as support them.  This is really the key of the loved ones being in the exam, they are educated to be a support while also helping their loved ones by providing the right kind of challenges to the patients vision. 

How can you make the life of someone with impaired vision easier?

Here are some good suggestions:
  • Consider the person - Every individual is different in terms of their age, character, functionality, and life experience as well as the nature of their impairment.
  • Respect their dignity - If you wish to provide assistance, you should respect their dignity at all times.
  • Don’t move things around - Moving things around can be very frustrating for someone with low vision, so keep things in the same place.
  • Consider the environment - Keep the environment in mind at all times. A visually impaired woman preparing you a cup of tea in her own home will likely be fine. It is clearly a different situation than a visually impaired man lost in a crowded mall.
  • Encourage them to visit a low vision optometrist - You should encourage your family members with impaired vision to schedule routine eye exams with a low vision optometrist. Help them maximize their visual abilities by accompanying them to understand how to assist them.
  • Follow our website & social media - Watch our videos and read our articles regularly on our website and social media accounts.

Schedule an appointment

If your loved one is suffering from vision impairment and you would like to know more about how to assist them, speak to our residency trained low vision optometrist. You can schedule a low vision consultation by calling [mbv name="token-practice-phone"].
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Does my Child Have Dyslexia?
[embed]https://youtu.be/J_ZAldp6sk0[/embed] A person with developmental dyslexia (DD) has severe and persistent problems in learning to read skills. This impairment is not associated with mental age, vision acuity difficulties, or inadequate education.There are an estimated 3.5 percent of students with reading disorders receiving special education services.   While dyslexia and vision are not related, there is a common theme in that both of them show similar symptoms. And therefore many students who have difficulty with reading are assumed to be dyslexic when in fact they are dealing with a vision issue. Aproximately 15% or more of children will have a developmental vision problem that is severe enough to impact their ability to read.  This is why we strongly urge parents to bring their child for a developmental vision evaluation if they suspect or were diagnosed with Dyslexia. In that way they can rule out that the symptoms that they are seeing are not vision related. 

What is Dyslexia?

Dyslexia is a learning disability that is particularly known for affecting reading and spelling. It affects the brain, not the eyes, and is highly genetic. Dyslexia has numerous types and can vary widely in severity. Basically, dyslexia is a problem with matching visual and auditory information, also known as decoding. Many students report that they have difficulty decoding and encoding, which means they can look at the word and come up with the right spelling, but do not understand what it means. Such individuals fall into the category of being dyslexic, as it is a common symptom of dyslexia. However, it is necessary to conduct all the additional tests that can help determine if it's dyslexia or if it's a problem with decoding or encoding. It could also be a vision issue.

Why is a comprehensive eye exam vital for a dyslexic patient?

Some patients have dyslexia but are told by their eye doctor that they need an eye exam even if they have dyslexia. It is very important for a child to undergo a developmental eye examination because it will allow them to determine if they have visual problems that might interfere with their understanding of their learning, or if they have body-vision problems that may make it difficult to understand orientation and relate to letters and numbers.

Schedule a developmental eye exam

Having your child's eyes examined is recommended if they have dyslexia or if you suspect that they have dyslexia. Our optometrists have helped children from all over Los Angeles who are struggling with reading and classroom performance by identifying underlying vision problems that are causing their difficulties. Most optometrists do not perform developmental eye exams, so finding a specialist is necessary to determine the cause of their symptoms and the best treatment options. If you would like to schedule a developmental eye exam with us, please call [mbv name="token-practice-phone"].
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How can hands held Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) help people with low vision?
[embed]https://youtu.be/7FZwbgqBSGE[/embed] Approximately 12 million people 40 years and over in the United States have vision impairment. Hands held Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) systems have improved the quality of life of people suffering from low vision through providing them with a high-tech vision aid that magnifies images, improves color contrast, and is hands free. CCTVs primary use is to magnify what is seen by using the video camera to provide magnification on reading materials or other things when we need to see something on a bigger screen. 

What a portable CCTV? What is it used for?

A portable CCTV works the same way as a conventional CCTV (which are usually very large and kept in one place at the home, work or school), except that it is in a handheld design. The benefits of a portable device is that it can be put in a pocket or purse and brought to the grocery store, to the classroom and for any thing that is outside of your home and work. Portable devices have become increasingly popular and versatile. 
  • Increased magnification - For a portable device,let's say you want to see a menu, so you'll place this over it. In addition, it has its own lighting system, which is very useful for video magnification, and it can have various magnifications.  Like a desktop device you can use it to magnify anything from reading, drawings, arts and crafts, sewing and more. Everything is conveniently projected onto the screen at the desired magnification and other settings. Another example is magnifying school materials and then flipping the camera to magnify what is on the board.  The great thing about CCTV is you can adjust the magnification anywhere from two or four times all the way up to almost 30 times. That is all the magnification you have at your disposal.
  • Changing the contrast - As it is a digital device, you can also change its contrast. For instance, if you're still not getting enough contrast with the original colored image, you can switch to various ones and select the one that suits you best. Some people are more comfortable with less lighting. Nevertheless, contrast can make a big difference as well.
  • Taking a picture - With certain systems, if you are looking at a map and want to get directions to somewhere, you can take a photo of it, and then you can move it, essentially freezing the image. From there, you can even zoom in if necessary, and then when you unzoom or take off the freeze, you're back to the live feed.

How heavy is a handheld CCTV? How long does the battery last?

They are usually very lightweight but it does depend on the device. Their battery usually lasts about five hours, sometimes more, and they come with a portable charger. For example the Ruby 7 HD, a popular option has these specifications:
  • Continuous zoom with 2x–24x magnification
  • See more on the vibrant 7-inch screen
  • Lightweight design at 18 ounces
  • Fast reading with no blur
  • Unique PivotCam rotating camera
  • Advanced Features
  • Freeze Frame with adjustable magnification and panning
  • Adjustable Reading Line and Masks to keep your place
  • 20 high-contrast color viewing modes so you can adjust text to be easy on your eyes
  • Built-in reading stand
  • HDMI port to connect to your TV
  • Save images and send to computer with USB port
  • 4 hours continuous use
  • Includes charger, carrying case, and USB cable

Schedule an appointment at Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach

If you or your loved one has low vision, and standard magnification tools do not provide the visual improvements needed, you may want to consider a CCTV device. Our low vision optometrist can provide many options that can allow low vision patients to regain their independence, work, read and participate in other recreational activities again.  Find out more about how CCTV technology and other visual aids can improve your quality of life by booking an appointment with our low vision optometrist today by calling [mbv name="token-practice-phone"].
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What is peripheral vision loss?
[embed]https://youtu.be/ka2VDdT91TM[/embed] Peripheral vision loss is when someone has a hard time seeing things to the side. While they can focus and visualize straight ahead, they may not be able to see what's around the target or thing that they are focusing on.

What are some examples of peripheral vision?

  • When walking someone who has a deficit in their peripheral vision may bump into walls or people as they dont see the things around them. 
  • A baseball pitcher needs excellent peripheral vision. This is because they are looking straight ahead at the batter but need to be aware if someone is stealing a base using their peripheral vision. 
  • When we drive we use our central vision to see what is going on in front of the car while being mindful of what is happening to our sides using our peripheral vision. 
  • If someone is at the park and they are reading a book, and are distracted by a bird flying in the sky, that is because they are using their peripheral vision. 

What are the symptoms of peripheral vision loss?

The following are common signs or indicators of peripheral vision loss. It should be noted that there are people who experience no symptoms.
  • Tunnel vision
  • Veil/Curtain
  • Light shimmering
  • Sensitivity to light and glare
  • Mobility issues such as bumping into things 
  • Night-blindness
  • Tripping over objects

What medical conditions can cause peripheral vision loss?

Peripheral vision loss can be caused by a number of medical conditions. Each in a different way. Following are some medical conditions that can cause peripheral vision loss:
  • Diabetic retinopathy: When you have diabetic retinal changes, peripheral vision loss tend to be more in patches as opposed to tunnel vision.
  • Advanced glaucoma: It can also cause peripheral vision changes. The condition results from excessive intraocular pressure from fluid. It can cause permanent vision loss if left untreated.
  • Brain aneurysms put pressure on the optic nerve in the brain, affecting vision. There are a variety of visual symptoms associated with cerebral aneurysms, including loss of peripheral vision.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa: This includes several types of congenital eye complications which affect the retina.
  • Strokes: Oftentimes a person who has a stroke will have part of their peripheral vision impacted, for example hemianopsia is a condition following a stroke where half of the visual field is missing.
  • Ocular migraine and vitreous floaters may impair peripheral vision. While these causes cause less serious vision loss than those listed above, you should schedule a low vision consultation if you are experiencing vision loss due to them.

How can peripheral vision loss be treated?

There are primarily two effective ways to assist peripheral vision loss:
  • Prisms: The prism shifts the image from the peripheral to the central view, resulting in vision. There are several advantages to choosing this option, including the fact that the results are usually instantaneous, effective, and relatively inexpensive.
  • Neuro-Optometric rehabilitation: Neuro-optometric rehabilitation allows the brain to learn how to expand its field of vision. The goal of such a program is to maximize the remaining vision of a person by learning new strategies.

Schedule a medical eye exam for peripheral vision loss in Los Angeles

We encourage you to schedule an appointment with our low vision optometrist if you experience or suspect that you may be losing your side vision. Our functional optometrists work with patients that have lost their peripheral vision and can provide advanced treatment through our offices specialties of low vision and neuro optometric rehabilitation. In order to rule out other medical complications, our optometrist may suggest an evaluation with other specialists. Call us at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] to schedule an eye exam.
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What is a low vision optometrist?
[embed]https://youtu.be/jUJmlwrRSIw[/embed] In the United States, approximately 12 million people over the age of 40 have vision impairment. In the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area there are an estimated 680 thousand people with low vision.  A Low vision optometrist is a specialist that works in conjunction with a retinal specialist or Ophthalmologist to help people with vision loss of any kind by helping them achieve the most with their remaining vision. The low vision optometrist will identify the patient's visual goals, then work with the patient and their loved ones to find solutions to enable the best possible vision and accomplishment of those visual goals. .

Who needs to see a low vision optometrist?

  • Anyone for whom their current glasses or contact lenses are not sufficient for them to function visually the way they would like
  • Anyone who struggles with reading after vision loss and who may just want to more easily be able able to read the newspaper, a book, or their computer 
  • Anyone who may want to drive, even though they may not have the vision standards for driving. With the correct guidance and devices  they may still be allowed to drive with certain restrictions.
  • Having difficulty seeing faces of their loved ones 
  • Anyone that has trouble moving around without bumping things or falling 
  • Anyone whose vision is causing difficulties with their daily functioning

What are the causes of low vision?

There are many types of eye disease and medical conditions that cause this condition. They include the following:
  • Diabetic retinopathy
  • Cataracts
  • Retinitis pigmentosa
  • Age-related macular degeneration
  • Injury to the optic nerve
  • Strokes
  • Stargardt 
  • Best disease 
  • Juvenile Retinoschisis 
  • Ocular Albinism

How can a low vision optometrist help you?

The low vision optometrist can assist a patient in obtaining the right guidance, understanding, and resources or other measures they need in order to achieve their visual goals. Low vision optometrists definitely work towards task-oriented goals. Specialized glasses, handheld magnification, tinted lenses, prisms, and high tech devices can provide better vision for many patients. A low vision optometrist not only helps find the best devices to improve vision but also guides the patient and shares resources to enable the most productive life after vision loss.   Some of the devices that a low vision optometrist may recommend include: 
  • Prismatic glasses: Sometimes also known as high-powered reading glasses.
  • Microscopic glasses: Suitable for reading or working up close.
  • Bioptic telescopes: These are similar to spectacles, and they improve the ability to see far away. Some states allow people to drive with them.
  • Magnifiers: These range from handheld models to those with fixed stands that are more powerful.
  • CCTV: A magnifying device that projects images onto a monitor for enhanced magnification.

Schedule a low vision eye exam

It is the primary responsibility of a low vision optometrist to help people return to a normal life in which they are able to perform everyday tasks. Get in touch with our residency trained low vision optometrist, located north of Long Beach in Bellflower.  Call [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] or visit us at [mbv name="practice-name"] to schedule a low vision eye exam.
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Are school vision screenings reliable?
[embed]https://youtu.be/BQrHx-PEHcE[/embed] According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), school vision screenings only cover 4% of a comprehensive eye exam and miss 75% of vision problems.

Los Angeles Pediatric Optometrist, Dr. Ikeda explains

School vision screenings are essential in the opinion of Dr. Eric Ikeda FCOVD who has decades of experience in the field. He missed school vision screenings in childhood, because he was shy which resulted in his vision problem not being detected. Consequently, his eyesight was getting worse. He had difficulty copying off the board, so the teacher sent him to the nurse, who diagnosed him with nearsightedness. With the local school districts, Dr. Ikeda has been working on an effective, but efficient way to screen children's vision in the local school district. Students are often tested only at 20 feet during school screenings. It's mostly distance acuity that's measured. Dr. Ikeda has implemented both distance and near screening as most of the children spend most of their time reading and writing on their desks. Therefore, both of these distances must be evaluated to help children learn effectively.

What is a RightEye Sensorimotor? How can it be used in vision screening?

The RightEye Sensorimotor examination system can be used by optometrists and ophthalmologists to identify binocular vision issues and oculomotor dysfunction objectively and quickly on every patient. One of the benefits of using this technology during a school screening is that it allows the students to undergo a more thorough evaluation while being mindful of the need to check many students every day.

How do we conduct our school vision screenings?

We at Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach work a lot with the private and public schools. Rather than just requesting students to look at a letter chart, we have established a more comprehensive visual screening. They will be examined for eye movement skills and we will have them listen to certain sounds, or do certain tests to determine whether or not they suffer from auditory visual deficits. Additionally, we have them copy something to show us how well they grasp pencils and if they have the ability to visualize what the target is and be able to transfer that image onto paper. When we conduct those types of screenings, we enlist the help of several parents so that they can see how comprehensive the visual process is. As they see their child and their performance, they're able to get a better understanding of why they're having difficulty doing certain things like spelling or when they are engaging in physical activities. Much of that involves visual processes.

Schedule a comprehensive eye exam or school screening!

We would be happy to come to your school and provide an advanced developmental school vision screening at no charge for your students. Call our office today at  [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] to discuss the next steps to set up a school vision screening in Los Angeles.  Furthermore, when it comes to checking your child's health, you wouldn't rely on an overly simple screening performed by somebody who's not an expert in that field. So while a school vision screening is an important first step, it is highly encouraged that every child have a comprehensive developmental eye exam before entering into first grade.  It is important to take good care of your eyes, especially your children's eyes. To schedule a comprehensive eye exam you can call us at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] or visit us at [mbv name="practice-name"].
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Importance of lighting for people with low vision
[embed]https://youtu.be/Tko8bgBslSw[/embed] More light is better most of the time, but it is crucial for patients with vision loss. More light is better for two reasons. One advantage is you see more contrast on whatever you are looking at. This enhances the contrast between dark and light edges. Thus, you can see the image better, even if it is magnified. Additionally, when you have more light, your pupils shrink as well, depending on what you're looking at. People always feel like they can see much better outside in the daylight. It happens because your pupils become smaller, and your natural range of focus increases. Therefore, having extra light has a double-sided advantage. There are some instances where lighting, or at least more lighting, does not work. In most cases though, the added light does help to increase the contrast and visibility.

Why is it important to visit a low vision optometrist to learn about lighting? 

With so many options of lighting available it is really important to speak with a low vision optometrist who has experience with guiding a patient with vision loss on the important aspects of lighting. 

Where does a low vision person need lighting? 

One thing that is important is to identify for the patient the places where lightning will have the most impact. For example, is the patient struggling with reading? In which case an adjustable floor lamp next to their favorite reading chair is the answer. However if the patient is struggling with mobility and bumping into things then the overall level of home lighting may need improvement. 

What kind of lighting improves color contrast? 

It is important to understand that not all lighting provides a low vision patient with the same improvements to color contrast. When looking for lighting it is recommended to find a light that is full spectrum or has color rendering index (CRI) of over 90. This will improve the quality of color that the light reflects. 

What kind of bulb should a low vision patient get? 

With so many different options to choose from it can be hard to know if you should get fluorescent, LED, Halogen, or incandescent. A low vision optometrist can guide you on the best lighting for your needs. For example LED is more adaptable with various form factors, adjustable strengths, high CRI, and less heat generation. 

Contact us!

Dr. Sarah Wolff is a residency trained low vision optometrist serving patients with vision loss from the greater Los Angeles area. She can steer you to where you can purchase these kinds of light bulbs and you can use these lighting tips to effectively function with low vision on a daily basis. We at Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach will be glad to answer any questions or concerns you may have. For a low vision evaluation, please call [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] or fill out the contact form [mbv name="token-appointment-link-with-text"].
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Comprehensive eye exams vs functional vision exams
[embed]https://youtu.be/sxXwdMC9gQA[/embed] In most cases, people go to the eye doctor and everything looks fine. Normal comprehensive eye exams are designed to determine the health of your eyes, which is of great importance. To ensure all is well in the back of your eye, you should have your eyes dilated once a year. When an eye doctor examines your vision, the doctor checks for distance and near vision and prescribes glasses or contact lenses if you can't see clearly.

What does a functional vision exam entail?

Like a comprehensive eye exam, a functional eye exam includes checking your eye health, refraction, and whether you are nearsighted, farsighted, presbyopic, or astigmatic. During a functional vision exam, our eye doctor also carefully examines each eye to determine if the focusing system is balanced. Do you have adequate stability and flexibility? In addition, they assess how well you are able to control eye coordination and your movement patterns.  In the event that our doctors find that there is another issue, such as binocular dysfunction, then they start investigating how this is affecting your ability to function and read. Your visualization is often effective when you struggle with certain things at home. In addition, they examine visual perceptual or motor difficulties.

What happens if the eye doctor detects a functional vision problem?

Normally, if those things are identified, you would undergo further testing. Depending on the doctors findings they will recommend a sensorimotor evaluation or perceptual evaluation to further diagnose what they are finding. At this point, you realize your vision has been affected. Even if you are able to see 20/20, your eyes are probably not well coordinated, and this is why you feel so clumsy. In addition, you may discover that your short-term memory is impaired when you think about doing something and realize that you do not possess a good ability to visualize any kind of visual memory that will allow you to recall effectively. Once the eye doctor has run further tests they will recommend a treatment plan. Many times that includes vision therapy.  A considerable number of studies have shown that correcting vision problems with vision therapy can significantly reduce visual symptoms and improve reading performance.

Schedule an eye exam for vision therapy

In some cases, a standard comprehensive eye exam may not be sufficient, this is especially true when the patient is experiencing symptoms of poor vision after having an eye exam. Take our visual assessment to see if you have symptoms that indicate a functional vision problem.  It may be necessary to receive a functional eye exam to have your vision examined from all angles. Dr. Ikeda is a world renowned clinician in functional vision with decades of experience and would be happy to help you. You can schedule an eye exam for vision therapy by calling [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] . 
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Who needs Low Vision Care?
[embed]https://youtu.be/Ga0iSA2hQ8Q[/embed] Approximately 12 million people 40 years and over in the United States have vision impairment. Anyone can become affected by low vision because it occurs due to a variety of medical conditions and injuries. Discover who should visit a low vision optometrist in this blog.

What is low vision?

It is a problem that affects the daily activities of both adults and children; people with low vision may find it hard to read newspapers, watch television, drive, use the phone, and perform other daily activities. 

What are the primary symptoms of low vision?

Both adults and children can suffer from low vision. This condition is more common in older people. For example, 40% or more of low vision is caused by Age Related Macular Degeneration  The following symptoms are often reported by people with visual impairment:
  • Difficulty seeing details
  • Blurred or hazy vision
  • Tunnel vision
  • Poor depth perception 
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Body posture problems
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue when reading
  • Change to decreased ability to read, use a computer etc. 
  • Double vision

Who should see a low vision optometrist?

Patients who would need to see a low vision optometrist are generally those who have trouble seeing things visually with their glasses or contact lenses. If they need more than just a prescription change to allow them to read what they need to see, then a low vision optometrist can help them meet their goals. It can sometimes be as simple as changing the type of glass or the type of glasses, or it may be more advanced, such as magnifiers or phone applications or even installing different programs on their computer. A low vision optometrist will guide the patient and their loved ones through understanding their visual condition and the options available to improve their remaining vision. 

Schedule an eye exam at Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach, Los Angeles's Premier Low Vision Clinic

A visit to our low vision optometrist is strongly recommended if you experience vision loss that interferes with your daily life. You will receive an assessment of your remaining vision as well as guidance on the best type of low vision glasses or optics will help the patient acheive their visual goals. In addition to eye glasses with magnification and improved contrast, our low vision optometrist will discuss how other visual aid devices may be used to enable you to perform tasks that have become difficult. To schedule a low vision exam, call us at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] or fill out our contact form [mbv name="token-appointment-link-with-text"].
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Testimonials


  • I haven't actually used the optometrist side, so my review is limited to the vision therapy offered.  This office was recommended by my occupational therapist for the treatment of my double vision following a stroke.


    Claire A.

  • Love this location. I had a brain injury accident from day one one. All the team make you feel you still important and hope in the horizon after when the medical system fell you miserably. Dr. Ikeda very professional and very understanding about your issue. Two tombs up.


    Jim K.

  • My husband and I were immediately impressed with Dr Ikeda. I was hit by a car while cycling which caused broken bones and three brain injuries. The brain injuries caused double vision. Dr. Ikeda examined my eyes and got me started on vision therapy with his occupational therapist who specializes in vision therapy.  She (Chris) is absolutely great.  I am impressed with the array of tools used to help recover my binocular vision.  I am doing things I never thought were possible (balance boards etc).  Chris pushes me and keeps me motivated. I really enjoy my sessions with her.  The office staff is always friendly and they have a wonderful appointment reminder tool that makes it easy to keep my calendar up to date. I am happy the rehab center at Little Co. of Mary recommended them!!


    Teresa S.

  • The Vision Therapy is handled in a separate office through a different door from the shared waiting room. Chris, the vision therapist, has a wide and varied assortment of tools, equipment and resources to best evaluate and treat most vision issues. After just a few visits, my double vision became easier to control, using exercises developed during the therapy process. It was time well-spent.


    Joe M.

  • I have been coming here since I can remember. I love it here. The staff is so amazing and nice. They explain everything they gonna do and never make you feel rushed. Dr. Ikeda has always been my doctor and I would never want another one. He is the doctor for my whole family and is always asking how everyone is doing. I am also so crazy about picking out my frames and have to try so many and each person who helps me take the time and lets me try them all on. I would never want to go anywhere else! I definitely would recommend this office to anyone looking for a great eye doctor.


    Kayla W.

Blog

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