Routine Eye Care

What Is Routine Eye Care?

It is a crucial part of taking care of the health of our body as it is a periodic assessment by an optometrist to check the clarity of vision and overall eye health. If an individual requires or already wears corrective glasses or contact lenses, the evaluation will show if there are updates and changes in the patient’s eyesight.

Routine testing is critical for preventing eye diseases and detecting early signs of conditions such as glaucoma, macular degeneration, and many other disorders. Frequency is usually determined based upon individual age, health, and family history. Speak with your optometrist to determine what is best for you.

Many experts recommend that children have an eye assessment before starting grade school, followed by annual testing. Healthy adults usually receive more comprehensive tests following age 40, provided there isn't an underlying condition or medical history.

What to Expect at an Eye Exam

An eye exam on average usually takes 30 minutes or less. Depending upon the findings, further testing may be required. The optometrist will begin the appointment by asking you questions about your eye health and about your medical history. Always inform the optometrist of any eye issues you may be experiencing.

Standard Tests

The eye exam includes the following tests: 

  • Visual acuity: This checks overall clarity of vision. You will be asked to read from the Snellen Chart where the letters decrease in size as you progress down the chart. You will probably recognize this well known chart by the large E at the top as it is a standard tool for checking how well a patient can see.

    If the patient is a young child who has not learnt the alphabet yet, the optometrist will use a chart with various well known symbols, such as a picture of a house or butterfly to test how well the child can see.

  • Binocular testing: This is an assessment of how well the eyes work in unison, both while looking close up and while looking at a distance. In the cover test, each eye is covered one at a time while the patient focuses on an object. The optometrist observes how one eye responds while the other eye is being covered which can provide important information on how the eyes work together as a team.

  • Stereopsis: You will be given polaroid glasses to allow you to see certain images up close in 3D and this evaluates your depth perception.

  • Near Point of Convergence: This measures the ability your eyes have to move inwards in sync in order to focus on a target up close.

  • Eye movements: The optometrist will check how smoothly your eyes can move in all directions without causing any discomfort. 

  • Visual Field Screening: An evaluation is performed to determine if there are any visual field defects. You will be asked to focus on a central target while identifying how many fingers the optometrist is holding up at different points in the periphery. 

  • Refraction: The optometrist will determine your current and accurate prescription to decide if you need glasses or contact lenses. There are various tools and tests that the optometrist will perform in order to arrive at your prescription using both subjective and objective methods. Different lenses are used and you will be asked which options allow you to see more clearly.

    Through refraction, the optometrist will let you know if you are nearsighted (known medically as myopia) or farsighted (hyperopia). It’s also possible that you have an astigmatism which is typically when your eye is not perfectly round and therefore another element called a cylinder is added to your prescription to correct the astigmatism and allow for clear vision.

  • Evaluating the health of the eye: The optometrist will assess the health of your eyes through a visual inspection. This includes shining a retinoscope on the pupil to assess the response to light. Additionally dilating eye drops are administered to enlarge the pupils and to enable a complete evaluation of the eye through fundoscopy which uses a light and a magnifying lens to inspect the critical retina section at the back of the eye.

    Depending on age and medical history, testing for glaucoma may become part of routine evaluations. It is an easy way to prevent the onset of this condition, by assessing the eye pressure.

 

Possible Outcomes of the Eye Exam

At the end of your eye exam, the optometrist will explain to you all of the findings and any questions that you have will be addressed. You will be informed if you have nearsightedness, farsightedness, and/ or an astigmatism and the optometrist will discuss with you options for glasses and/ or contact lenses. 

If any eye drops or medical prescriptions are needed, the optometrist will provide you with a prescription and explanation. If more testing is needed, it will be discussed with you when and where is the best time and place to do that.

Frequently Asked Questions

Yes. It's very advisable to bring your current prescription glasses to the appointment.  Assessments for refraction may indicate a need for changes to your prescriptions.

Yes. Exams are essential for maintaining eyesight and preventing and detecting complications. Additionally, many conditions are hard to detect, and they take time to fully manifest. There are excellent tools to prevent future problems.  Eye health is more than just how well you see.

There are several steps that are recommended to take good care of your eyes:

  • Schedule routine eye exams as recommended by your optometrist
  • Eating healthily, engaging in physical activity, and refraining from smoking or high consumption of alcohol contributes to good eye health
  • Wear sunglasses and, when relevant, protective goggles, if you engage in activities where there is a risk of sustaining an eye injury
  • Be careful to avoid touching your eyes. If you have to touch your eyes, such as when applying contact lenses, be sure to wash your hands first and to practice hygienic recommendations
  • Monitor and follow up if any signs of infection, allergy or trauma are detected in your eyes such as redness, swelling, pain/ discomfort, double or blurred vision or if there is a loss of vision
Dr. Ikeda cartoon

What to Expect at an Eye Exam

An eye exam on average usually takes 30 minutes or less. Depending upon the findings, further testing may be required. The optometrist will begin the appointment by asking you questions about your eye health and about your medical history. Always inform the optometrist of any eye issues you may be experiencing.

Testimonials


  • I haven't actually used the optometrist side, so my review is limited to the vision therapy offered.  This office was recommended by my occupational therapist for the treatment of my double vision following a stroke.


    Claire A.

  • Love this location. I had a brain injury accident from day one one. All the team make you feel you still important and hope in the horizon after when the medical system fell you miserably. Dr. Ikeda very professional and very understanding about your issue. Two tombs up.


    Jim K.

  • My husband and I were immediately impressed with Dr Ikeda. I was hit by a car while cycling which caused broken bones and three brain injuries. The brain injuries caused double vision. Dr. Ikeda examined my eyes and got me started on vision therapy with his occupational therapist who specializes in vision therapy.  She (Chris) is absolutely great.  I am impressed with the array of tools used to help recover my binocular vision.  I am doing things I never thought were possible (balance boards etc).  Chris pushes me and keeps me motivated. I really enjoy my sessions with her.  The office staff is always friendly and they have a wonderful appointment reminder tool that makes it easy to keep my calendar up to date. I am happy the rehab center at Little Co. of Mary recommended them!!


    Teresa S.

  • The Vision Therapy is handled in a separate office through a different door from the shared waiting room. Chris, the vision therapist, has a wide and varied assortment of tools, equipment and resources to best evaluate and treat most vision issues. After just a few visits, my double vision became easier to control, using exercises developed during the therapy process. It was time well-spent.


    Joe M.

  • I have been coming here since I can remember. I love it here. The staff is so amazing and nice. They explain everything they gonna do and never make you feel rushed. Dr. Ikeda has always been my doctor and I would never want another one. He is the doctor for my whole family and is always asking how everyone is doing. I am also so crazy about picking out my frames and have to try so many and each person who helps me take the time and lets me try them all on. I would never want to go anywhere else! I definitely would recommend this office to anyone looking for a great eye doctor.


    Kayla W.

Blog

pexels-andrea-piacquadio-3769995

Does my Child Have Dyslexia?

A person with developmental dyslexia (DD) has severe and persistent problems in learning to read skills. This impairment is not […]

Read More
SVR-Patient-with-SmartLux

How can hands held Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) help people with low vision?

Approximately 12 million people 40 years and over in the United States have vision impairment. Hands held Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) […]

Read More
adrian-swancar-roCfgvkBLVY-unsplash

What is peripheral vision loss?

Peripheral vision loss is when someone has a hard time seeing things to the side. While they can focus and […]

Read More
see all blogs

Contact Us To Amplify Your EyeCare

Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach Logo

Working Hours

Monday & Wednesday
9:00AM–6:00PM

Tuesday & Thursday
8:00AM–5:00PM

Saturday
By appointment only

Friday & Sunday
Closed

 

 

Location
16816 Clark Ave, Bellflower, CA 90706, United States
Fax
(562) 867-8719
Website Accessibility Policy
Safety protocols page
privacy policy
Cancellation Policy
For Patients
appointment
Call Us
Referrals
Assessments
For Patients
appointment
Call Us
Referrals
Assessments
eyefile-adduserphone-handsetcalendar-fullarrow-uparrow-right linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram