Are Contact Lenses Hard to Put In?

A common concern many people have when they consider starting to wear contact lenses is whether or not they will be hard to put in. Considering that, in a general sense, we are advised 

To avoid touching our eyes and certainly to avoid putting anything in our eyes, it isn’t an unexpected question.

Are Contact Lenses Hard to Put In? in Bellflower

Can Putting in Contact Lenses be Difficult?

The vast majority of the time, contact lenses are not hard at all to put in. In fact, they are generally easy to both apply and remove. However, this at least partially relies on other factors, such as a bit of practice at putting them in, and the contacts being fit properly.

Amplify Eyecare of Greater Long Beach

Kids and Contacts

For many parents, the question of the difficulty putting in contact lenses arises in regard to their kids preferring contacts over glasses. 

Fortunately, recent studies show that most kids have no problem when it comes to applying and removing contact lenses. In fact, in one recent study involving kids between the ages of 8 and 17 who were given soft contact lenses for the first time, the vast majority of them have no trouble with the contacts. And following the study, more than eighty percent of the kids involved stated that they felt the contacts were easy to manage.

Concerns Regarding Applying Contact Lenses

While most people don’t find contacts difficult to put on, there are some concerns people often have that should be addressed, if only to provide assurance that these aren’t things to worry about.

Concerns Regarding Applying Contact Lenses
Can a Contact Lens Go Behind my Eye?

Can a Contact Lens Go Behind my Eye?

This is a common fear with contacts, and if you’ve ever seen a contact lens flip under somebody’s eyelid, it can look a little disconcerting. However, it is technically impossible for a contact lens to actually get behind your eye, due to a thin membrane in the eye specifically designed to prevent objects of any kind from getting back there.

Can a Contact Lens Go Behind my Eye?

Can a Contact Lens Get Stuck on My Eye?

While it is possible for a soft contact lens to become stuck to the surface of the eye, it will always be removable. In most cases, all you will need to do is apply a few eye drops, and the moisture will help get it loose.

Will the Contacts be Uncomfortable to Wear?

It is reasonable for someone new to wearing contacts to be concerned that it’ll feel uncomfortable once they put it in. After all, if a speck of dust gets into an eye it can be annoying enough.

While there may be some mild discomfort the first few times you wear them, during which time you’re acutely aware of their presence, it should pass quickly. After wearing the contacts a couple of times, you won’t even notice they’re there.

In the unlikely event that they still bother you after a few days, you should contact your eye doctor, as this could be a sign there is an issue with the fit of the lenses, or the type or brand of the lenses is not ideal for you. In addition certain conditions may need a more customized contact lens to ensure comfort. If you find contact lenses uncomfortable you should discuss that with our eye doctor as this may be a sign of an underlying condition such as; dry eye disease, keratoconus, or corneal irregularities. 

Concerns Regarding Applying Contact Lenses
Can a Contact Lens Go Behind my Eye?

Putting on Contact Lenses: Ensure That They Aren’t a Challenge to Put in

Contact lenses shouldn’t be hard to put in, generally speaking, but there are things that can be done to make an issue even more unlikely.

Ensure Proper Fit

Making sure you have properly fitted contacts is important. Improperly fitted lenses are much more likely to be uncomfortable and cause other problems.

A fitting will be done by an eye doctor, and depending on the amount of space between your upper and lower eyelids when they’re open normally, the doctor may recommend a smaller or larger lens size. The doctor may also recommend exercises to ensure you don’t feel a need to blink while inserting the lenses.

It might take some practice, but it will get easier as time goes on.

Do a Dry Run 

If you’re having concerns about putting in your contact lenses, a dry run can be a good way of overcoming the fear of putting them in. This is done by practicing touching your eyes in a manner similar to what you’ll need to do when you start putting in your lenses.

To do this, you’ll first need to wash your hands, and then start slowly, touching first the eyelashes, then the upper and lower eyelids, finally working up to the white part of the eye. This will help desensitize your eyes and metnally get you used to the idea of touching your eye itself.

You can also practice holding the eyelid open and miming putting in a contact lens.

As with many things, it’s all in your head.

Your eye doctor can also help with this. Additionally, if you’re worried this might still be an issue, you can opt for lenses like overnight contacts, to limit the amount of time you’ll need to put them in and take them out.

Looking Away

As strange as it might sound, looking away as you put in the lens can help. While for most people, looking directly at the finger with the contact lens on it works just fine, it’s not for everyone.

To help yourself look away, find a mirror that you can sit close to, and position your face near it, and focus on the process of applying the lens as opposed to touching the eye.

Once the time comes to put the lens in, focus your gaze on a spot above you as you put the lens in. If the lens doesn’t land on the precisely right spot immediately, don’t worry. You can easily reposition it by closing your eyes and looking around.

Common Questions

First try not to panic! Some people may fear the contact lens may be trapped and go behind the eye into their brain, but don’t worry that’s impossible! If your contact lens is in the center of the eye and it’s just not coming off, then most likely the cause of your contacts getting stuck (if it’s a soft lens) is because the lens probably dried out. To help resolve this you can rinse your eye with a steady stream of sterile saline solution or use artificial tears, then close your eyes and gently massage your eyelids until you feel the lens move, then blink a couple of times and once the lens moves more freely then try again to remove your lens like you normally would. In the event your contact lens is dislodged from the center of your eye, then try to look in the opposite direction of where your lens would be. Again you can rinse your eye with sterile saline solution and gently massage your eyelids and blink to allow the lens to re-center and then remove like you normally would. In the event that you can’t get your contacts out, be sure to go to your eye doctor so they can help you remove it.
Are Contact Lenses Hard to Put In?
Dr. Ikeda cartoon

Summary

Contrary to what you might think, contact lenses aren’t hard to put on, and the difficulties that most people experience are psychological in nature, easily overcome by preparation. And, of course, your eye doctor will have to provide any assistance and guidance needed if you are having trouble.

 

If you have any questions, or if you would like to schedule a contact lens exam, you can contact Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach at (562) 925-6591 to make an appointment.

 

Testimonials


  • I haven't actually used the optometrist side, so my review is limited to the vision therapy offered.  This office was recommended by my occupational therapist for the treatment of my double vision following a stroke.


    Claire A.

  • Love this location. I had a brain injury accident from day one one. All the team make you feel you still important and hope in the horizon after when the medical system fell you miserably. Dr. Ikeda very professional and very understanding about your issue. Two tombs up.


    Jim K.

  • My husband and I were immediately impressed with Dr Ikeda. I was hit by a car while cycling which caused broken bones and three brain injuries. The brain injuries caused double vision. Dr. Ikeda examined my eyes and got me started on vision therapy with his occupational therapist who specializes in vision therapy.  She (Chris) is absolutely great.  I am impressed with the array of tools used to help recover my binocular vision.  I am doing things I never thought were possible (balance boards etc).  Chris pushes me and keeps me motivated. I really enjoy my sessions with her.  The office staff is always friendly and they have a wonderful appointment reminder tool that makes it easy to keep my calendar up to date. I am happy the rehab center at Little Co. of Mary recommended them!!


    Teresa S.

  • The Vision Therapy is handled in a separate office through a different door from the shared waiting room. Chris, the vision therapist, has a wide and varied assortment of tools, equipment and resources to best evaluate and treat most vision issues. After just a few visits, my double vision became easier to control, using exercises developed during the therapy process. It was time well-spent.


    Joe M.

  • I have been coming here since I can remember. I love it here. The staff is so amazing and nice. They explain everything they gonna do and never make you feel rushed. Dr. Ikeda has always been my doctor and I would never want another one. He is the doctor for my whole family and is always asking how everyone is doing. I am also so crazy about picking out my frames and have to try so many and each person who helps me take the time and lets me try them all on. I would never want to go anywhere else! I definitely would recommend this office to anyone looking for a great eye doctor.


    Kayla W.

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