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Testimonials

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    Finibus Bonorum
    Acount executive I Communication
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    Acount executive I Communication
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Our Values

Ambition
We are creating something worth creating, that will endure the test of time. We do this by relentlessly focusing on the success of our employees and customers. We’re grounded by humility and driven by ambition and expect our employees to be too.
a
Make It Fun
We believe in celebrating our successes, milestones and hard work, through recognition, appreciation and rewards
m
Passion For Learning
We want to be at the forefront of change and growth; there is always something we can learn.
p
Live The Golden Rule
We are empathetic and respectful of each other, customers and the communities we serve. We value, encourage and celebrate the gifts in one another and respect the inherent dignity and worth of every individual.
l
Integrity
We believe in honesty, openness, trust, respect and reliability in all that we do.
i
Focused Teams
Working together on a project is more important than who gets credit. We put trust in our teams and watch the incredible accomplishments happen when ego takes a backseat.
f
You Are Unique
We know it takes people with different ideas, strengths, interests, and cultural backgrounds to help us succeed.
y
Investing In Our Employees
“We train our people well enough so they can leave, treat them well enough so they don’t want to” (Richard Branson)
i
Transparency
We are honest about the actions we are taking, being upfront and visible.
t

our values

  • a

    Ambition

    We are creating something worth creating, that will endure the test of time. We do this by relentlessly focusing on the success of our employees and customers. We’re grounded by humility and driven by ambition and expect our employees to be too.
  • m

    Make It Fun

    We believe in celebrating our successes, milestones and hard work, through recognition, appreciation and rewards
  • p

    Passion For Learning

    We want to be at the forefront of change and growth; there is always something we can learn.
  • l

    Live The Golden Rule

    We are empathetic and respectful of each other, customers and the communities we serve. We value, encourage and celebrate the gifts in one another and respect the inherent dignity and worth of every individual.
  • i

    Integrity

    We believe in honesty, openness, trust, respect and reliability in all that we do.
  • f

    Focused Teams

    Working together on a project is more important than who gets credit. We put trust in our teams and watch the incredible accomplishments happen when ego takes a backseat.
  • y

    You Are Unique

    We know it takes people with different ideas, strengths, interests, and cultural backgrounds to help us succeed.
  • i

    Investing In Our Employees

    “We train our people well enough so they can leave, treat them well enough so they don’t want to” (Richard Branson)
  • t

    Transparency

    We are honest about the actions we are taking, being upfront and visible.

Lorem Ipsum

When and How often should you or your child have a Comprehensive Eye Exam?
[embed]https://youtu.be/pce5XnxgP6o[/embed] For kids or adults it is crucial to perform comprehensive eye exams in order to maintain ocular health and to recognize signs of developmental vision issues, eye injuries, allergies, infections, and neurological conditions. 

How frequently should eye examinations be scheduled?

Lets begin with a young child, they should undergo a basic screening as an infant. Dr. Ikeda recommends bringing your children in when you are comfortable. You can have a screening done by him and then he will go over different motor activities you can work on and suggest different types of toys. To preserve the safety of their children, he discusses things that parents need to be aware of. He gives them a lot of information as one parent to another to help them understand what is important for them for the child to develop normally. In his opinion, it is vital for him to see them early on. If there is no family history, or no issues to speak of, he usually tells them to have their child come back in about 24 months. He also prefers to see the child before they start kindergarten. Again, if he sees issues developing more due to the computers and devices, he tries to have them bring their children in more frequently like every 12 months. If there are no conditions, usually every 24 months.  As a patient gets older Dr. Ikeda will recommend patients to come in more frequently, sometimes even a few times per year. This is due to various diseases that can start to appear among older populations.

What symptoms require immediate care?

Contact us immediately to schedule an emergency eye exam if you experience symptoms of eye injury, infection, allergies, visual-motor dysfunction, or neurological deficits. Emergency treatment may be necessary depending on the severity, call our office at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] to find out the recommended next steps. Pay attention to any symptoms following a head injury or trauma.  Among the warning signs are:
  • Double vision, loss of vision, or blurriness
  • Pain and discomfort of the orbital region
  • Swelling, redness, drainage, discharge, or crustiness
  • A feeling that something is lodged in the eye
  • Bulging eyes
  • Floaters
  • Difficulty with balance or nausea

Schedule an appointment at Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach

Comprehensive eye exams, for any age, are essential for maintaining overall visual health. If you are uncertain about how often you should take your child in for an eye exam, you can call us at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"]. Any questions you may have will be answered by our caring and knowledgeable team. 
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Does Diabetes and Diabetic Retinopathy affect Vision?
[embed]https://youtu.be/XOpo42oQxLE[/embed] Approximately 4.1 million Americans aged 40 and older have diabetic retinopathy. Nearly 899,000 people in this age range have vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a condition caused by diabetes that usually affects both eyes. Diabetic retinopathy affects one out of three diabetic patients. A high glucose level in the body can damage the tiny blood vessels in the light-sensitive tissue in the back of the eye, called the retina. A variety of eye problems may result from this, ranging from unnoticeable symptoms to blindness. The earliest stage of this disease is the most common and causes the least amount of vision loss. 

How does diabetic retinopathy affect your vision?

The common symptom of diabetic retinopathy is that you end up with vision loss in certain areas of the eye. Most of the time there is not a complete change in vision, rather sections of the vision start to go, usually due to what can occur in the retinal vasculature. When your sugar levels are high, bleeding can occur causing patches in your vision where you cannot see well. Therefore, a lot of times it's more about being able to find areas where you see best using magnification and then focusing on the areas where you don't see so well. Additionally, there are problems with contrast because with less lighting, the retina begins to lose some of its ability to see in some areas. This means that sometimes you are not getting the full effect of lighting. As a result, you are essentially almost blinded by the glare. People with diabetic retinopathy can benefit from using tinted glasses outside as well as indoors. In fact, using a tint to change how they see can be extremely helpful for them.

Are diabetic retinopathy's effects confined to the central vision or do they affect peripheral vision as well?

Both central and peripheral vision are affected by diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy can also cause diabetic macular edema, which adversely affects your central vision to the point where you cannot see 20/20 any longer. Patches or areas with poor sight will usually be in the periphery. Therefore, diabetic retinopathy may cause central vision loss if the macula is affected and then there may be patches of vision loss in the periphery depending on where the bleeding occurs.

When does diabetic retinopathy affect your central and peripheral vision?

The changes in your central and peripheral vision generally occur when your sugar levels are not controlled for a long period of time. It is possible for diabetic retinopathy to go years without changes. When a person is unable to control their sugar levels, whether they're at high levels for a long time, or if there is a lot of fluctuation in their sugar levels, then this puts more stress on the vessels. As the uncontrolled diabetes progresses, it can also make it worse. You will see more of the true vision loss from diabetic retinopathy over time when you have uncontrolled diabetic retinopathy for many years.

Schedule an eye exam at Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach 

Our team of experienced optometrists offers comprehensive medical eye exams for people at risk for diabetic retinopathy. Using state-of-the-art technology, including Optomap, OCTs and much more, we offer advanced care for diabetic retinopathy and early detection of the disease. To schedule an eye exam, please contact [mbv name="token-practice-phone"].
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Dry form of Age-related Macular Degeneration
[embed]https://youtu.be/KuujQSqu2NI[/embed] As many as 11 million people in the United States have some form of age-related macular degeneration. This number is expected to double to nearly 22 million by 2050. There are two forms of AMD. A dry form and a wet form. Dry form is the most common form of AMD. About 75% to 80% of AMD patients have the dry form. There are deposits beneath the retina of your eye, which is what causes your vision to be affected. In the case where it changes from the dry to the wet form, which can't be predicted if ever to occur, eye doctors aren't fully aware of the reasons as to why it would do so, but the reason they call it wet is because either fluid or blood start to accumulate due to a disruption of these deposits. That's where you get more visual changes, since it's a fluid underneath the retina rather than just small deposits causing disruptions within the retina.

How does dry AMD affect vision?

You can have varying degrees of even dry macular degeneration depending on how many deposits are under the retina, specifically at the macula. Some people with dry macular degeneration have minimal vision changes. They still see 20/20, they don't really see any significant change in their vision, but as it progresses, if it happens, they can still sustain significant vision loss.

What are the treatment options for dry AMD?

People with AMD tend to have the dry form at first. That's why eye doctors monitor so closely to see if anything changes. If it develops into what is known as wet macular degeneration, then there are options for treatment. Though it's not a cure, it does halt or stop the flow of the fluid underneath the retina. The goal is to keep the vision from deteriorating further. Whereas there is no formal treatment for the dry form. Vitamins that specifically strengthen or stabilize that macula are generally recommended by the eye doctors, and they have been shown in major studies to be effective. Whenever we see the earliest signs of macular degeneration we always recommend what are called AREDS2 supplements, which is the name of the study that documented the efficacy of these antioxidants, Age Related Eye Disease Study 2. The main components areLutein and Zeaxanthin, which are beta carotenes. Because they are in high concentration at the macula, the more we have, the more they stabilize the macula for the dry form. While found naturally in leafy greens and certain foods, it is largely lacking in a major way in western diets. 

Schedule an eye exam

If you have any questions about age related macular degeneration or if you suspect that your loved one is suffering from AMD, you should schedule a comprehensive eye exam as soon as possible. Our office is equipped with state of the art technology such as OCT and ERG, which advance our care and early diagnosis for macular degeneration. To schedule a medical eye exam call us at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"].
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What is Legal Blindness?
[embed]https://youtu.be/P8yI6AU5LAQ[/embed]

One million Americans were estimated to be legally blind.

An individual who cannot see 20/200 or better is considered legally blind. Even though it is just a legal definition, it means that a lot of people can have vision loss and see more than what people believe they should be able to see or they can have vision loss and see less than what people believe they should see.  For government services as well as other legal measures like driving, we have to have a notation of measurements. This is why the term legal blindness is used. 20/200 is a standard, but there are other factors involved, including visual field, since in some circumstances you can see 20/20, but your visual field prevents you from seeing clearly. All of those things are important when it comes to vision. Nevertheless, the term legal blindness is just a term to delineate legality in vision. The U.S. government’s definition is as follows: 
  • If you cannot reach better than 20/200 with corrective measures in the best eye
  • If you have 20 degrees or less of your field of vision

What conditions cause legal blindness?

Causes of blindness include:
  • People who are born blind may have visual deficiencies that meet this criteria.
  • Numerous eye diseases and disorders can affect the optic nerve, including glaucoma, cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, stargardt disease, retinitis pigmentosa, ocular albinism, age-related macular degeneration, and other ocular disorders.
  • Trauma can cause vision deficits which fall under this legal standard.

Schedule an Appointment

Legal blindness is not something you can diagnose yourself. Make an appointment with our low vision optometrist by calling [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] to assess visual acuity and field of vision, both of which are vital for an effective evaluation. If a person meets the legal criteria for blindness, it is relatively easy to determine. If you have been diagnosed with legal blindness or are experiencing vision loss that impacts your daily function, speak with our low vision optometrist about how to maximize your vision and live a normal life. Through appropriate interventions, people with permanent vision loss can maintain a fulfilling, independent and enjoyable life. Call us at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] to schedule a low vision evaluation. 
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Importance of Diabetic Eye Exams
[embed]https://youtu.be/D8agFDRDco4[/embed] In 2019, 37.3 million Americans, or 11.3% of the population, had diabetes. 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year. In Los Angeles County almost 20% of those ages 40-59 and almost 30% of those over 60 are diabetic.  Diabetes occurs when your body doesn't process blood sugar, otherwise known as glucose, an important source of energy. In general, glucose is derived from the food we eat and is carried through the bloodstream. Pancreas releases insulin as soon as blood sugar levels rise, as this hormone converts sugar into energy. Diabetes impairs this process, causing damage to many parts of the body including the eyes. Several eye problems can be caused by diabetes, including cataracts, blurry vision, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. 

Why is it necessary to have regular eye exams every year if you have Diabetes?

Everyone with diabetes should have an eye exam every year.The most significant concern with diabetes is to reduce the risk of permanent vision loss by keeping constant check that there is no cellular damage.  This takes place mainly to check the health of the eye itself, since the eye has a vasculature that delivers oxygen to the retina. When your vasculature is damaged in any way, which is caused by high sugar levels, it can further damage your vision if you don't control it. That's why it's so important to check it every year.  Studies have shown that omega-3 supplements can actually help stabilise or decrease any progression of the retina or the vasculature of the retina. However, Dr. Wolff always recommends her patients to talk to their primary care physician to see if that is something they would recommend for them. It's one thing that you would do even before you see any changes on the retina. Additionally, it is helpful to know where your sugar levels are because they do fluctuate throughout the day. When either it's too high all the time or fluctuates too much, then it essentially weakens those vessels. That's when they begin to leak fluids and sometimes blood. 

How important is it to take photos of the retina during a Diabetic Retinopathy Exam?

At Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach, we do a yearly diabetic dilation exam with high definition retinal photos to document good results or bad results and then show our patients what we see. We can show the patient those photos, which is great for documentation and education. It can be more profound to the patient when they witness changes in their retina. This also allows us to monitor it and to communicate with their primary care physician. So it is a good advantage to have. 

Why should you check your sugar levels more often if you have Diabetes?

Diabetes is fairly common, but the key is to catch it early and to understand how your body reacts to sugar. It is such an individual condition that what works for one person may not work for another. Dr. Wolff always tells her patients that when they have diabetes, it really is about learning how they react to different types of sugars, which is why it is so important to constantly check their blood sugar levels throughout the day.  

Contact us for a Diabetic Eye Exam in Los Angeles

If you or your loved one has diabetes, the experienced eye care team at Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach can help. You can contact us at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] to schedule a dilated diabetic eye exam and retinal imagery.
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Low Vision Treatment
[embed]https://youtu.be/7jeGFAUycbU[/embed] Low vision treatment is necessary when you have a condition that affects your vision, whether it's a disease or an incident that caused it, or something that causes it to become worse and you are not seeing as well as about 20/40, which is the DMV standard for a lot of states.  When a patient does not see 20/40 because of various reasons, such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, genetic conditions, and any condition that reduces a patient's vision, a low vision optometrist will help by focusing on solutions that are beyond the usual glasses or contact lenses. For someone with permanent vision loss, glasses are not going to help them see better because of the disease process or other factors.  A low vision evaluation is about helping the patient understand the options available for them to maximize their vision and get the most independence. 

Life with low vision

In the event that your low vision eye doctor determines that vision loss cannot be corrected by standard eyewear, medicine or surgery, they will assist you in finding ways to adapt. At first, these steps might seem challenging, but they will eventually lead to a more active and fulfilling lifestyle. You will likely be referred to a low vision specialist by an eye doctor who does not specialize in low vision. A low vision optometrist will assess your vision and prescribe low vision aids that are based on your needs and goals, such as:
  • Handheld magnifiers with lights
  • A digital magnifier for your desktop
  • Bioptic telescopes
  • An application that simplifies computer usage with features like magnification and text-to-speech
  • Printed material with large text
  • Sound recordings
  • Special light fixtures
  • Signature guides for signing checks and documents
  • With tinted UV filters, you may be able to enhance light sensitivity and contrast
 

Schedule a low vision evaluations in Los Angeles today

Schedule a low vision evaluation with our residency trained low vision optometrist, Dr. Sarah Wolff. Call us at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] to schedule an appointment. 
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Handheld Magnification Devices for Low Vision
[embed]https://youtu.be/GUotxsc1gBA[/embed] When a person has poor vision, magnification can help them see better.  By increasing the size of the thing the patient cannot see, the patient is able to see it. Our low vision optometrist at our Los Angeles Low Vision clinic is residency trained Dr. Sarah Wolff. She explains that during a low vision evaluation she places a significant emphasis on discussing with the patient about where magnification will make the biggest impact and how it will be used. Understanding patient goals is the key to determine the ideal device for a patient. 

Handheld magnifiers

When it comes to magnifiers, most people think of handheld magnifiers as the easiest to use. These can be purchased at a drugstore. They are usually quite large. However, they are usually not very high magnification. 2x magnification is standard and 3x is maximum. And while that will work for quite a lot of things, it doesn't work for everything. However, the big window is a nice feature. That's why they usually have a bigger window whenever the magnification is lower. Magnification of this type is used to quickly look at something. A great tool if you need to read a phone number or look at a recipe. If you were trying to read a newspaper with a magnifier like this, it would take so long. It's not very convenient for long-time reading because you'd have to move it around. The issue with hand-held magnifiers is that you have a smaller view and you have to move your hand around, so it doesn't always flow nicely. Trying to do that becomes somewhat cumbersome.

Handheld magnifiers with LED light

Handheld magnifiers with lights are also available. These magnifiers have the option to turn the light on and off. Their magnifying power is a bit higher so the window is bigger. Even though there can be some glare, it can actually help when the reading material has a darker background.

Stand magnifiers with LED light

A stand magnifier is still one of the most commonly prescribed low vision devices. Standard magnifiers are placed on the page. Ideally, you would place it on a table and then just move it along. This allows you to have a more comfortable reading experience when you read a newspaper on a table. It also features 2.5x magnification and a large window. As the magnification increases, the window gets smaller. Another benefit of a stand magnifier is that it comes with a light. Whenever you are reading in a dark space, it is best if there is a light in the magnifier because otherwise it becomes very dim and it is much more difficult to read.

Dome magnifiers

Dome magnifiers fall between handheld magnifiers, which are meant for short-term reading, and stand magnifiers, which are meant for long-term reading. They keep your hands free while reading. There is more light coming through, so everything is perfectly clear. A full case blocks the light. A lighted mechanism would then be necessary. However, this is pretty simple for desktop use.

Our Phones

We are lucky to live in a world with technology that assists people with vision loss. Most of us carry around a low vision device without realizing it, a phone.  Our phones can be adapted to use for contrast, magnification, and much more. 

Handheld CCTV- digital magnification

These are digital based handheld magnifiers that can provide a wide range of magnification powers, contrast improvements, and other tweaks that make reading more accessible.   

Visit us for a low vision evaluation

We welcome you to our practice located in Bellflower California. We have a passionate team of eye doctors and staff that take the time to help every patient achieve their best vision. Call our office at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] to schedule a low vision evaluation with Dr. Wolff. 
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Atkinson Hyperlegible Font
Named after Braille Institute founder, J. Robert Atkinson, Atkinson Hyperlegible font is great for low vision readers.  In contrast to traditional typography design, it emphasizes letterform distinction in order to increase character recognition, thus improving readability.  Anyone with low vision is welcome to use it for free!

What is low vision?

It is a loss of vision that cannot be treated with medical or surgical treatments or with conventional eyeglasses or contact lenses. Low vision is a condition that makes doing everyday tasks difficult. People with low vision must learn to adapt to their condition and can be helped with a variety of low vision devices and tools.

What makes Atkinson hyperlegible font so unique

There are times when it may be difficult for people with low vision to distinguish letters and numbers while reading. The Atkinson Hyperlegible font offers a variety of design techniques to differentiate commonly misinterpreted letters and numbers.
  • Recognizable footprints: Character boundaries are clearly defined, making understanding possible across the visual-ability spectrum
  • Differentiated letterforms: Letter pairs are differentiated from one another to dramatically increase legibility
  • Unambiguous characters: Designed to improve readability and distinguishability
  • Exaggerated forms: Letter shapes are exaggerated to improve clarity
  • Opened counterspace: Some of the open areas on certain letters are enlarged to provide more distinction
  • Angled spurs and differentiated tails: enhance recognition and define distinct style
  • Circular details: Links to the history of Braille Institute and braille dots

Characteristics of Atkinson hyperlegible font

  • Four fonts, including two weights (regular, bold, italics, italics bold)
  • 1,340 total glyphs across all fonts, 335 per font
  • Accent characters supporting 27 languages
  • For designers and anyone interested in making written materials easier to read across the entire visual-ability spectrum
  • Improve legibility and readability for low vision readers

Downloading and installing it

Click here to download the Atkinson hyperlegible font for free Instructions for installing the font Download the .zip file linked above. Extract the file to reveal additional folders inside. Find the Open Type Format (.otf) files for the four Atkinson Hyperlegible fonts (regular, italic, bold, bold italic) inside the “Print Fonts” folder. *Note that only the Open Type files are needed to install the font on a computer. There are five additional font formats in the “Web Fonts” folder for use on the web. On Windows 10: Double-click the font file, then click the “Install” button in the font preview window that opens. The font will be installed. Alternatively, right-click on the file and choose “Install” from the pop-up menu that appears. On Mac: Double-click the font file in the Finder, then click “Install Font” in the font preview window that opens. After your Mac validates the font and opens the Font Book app, the font is installed and available for use.

Schedule a low vision evaluation at [mbv name="practice-name"]

At [mbv name="practice-name"] we offer advanced low vision optometric eyecare. Our low vision optometrist spends time with each patient to understand their visual capabilities and what goals they have for improving their vision. After a full evaluation our low vision optometrist will help guide the patient through the various options available such as handheld and wearable devices that provide additional magnification, color contrast, and field of view. Furthermore our low vision optometrist will guide the patient on the resources available through different organizations and tools that can help them in their activities of daily living. Call our office at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] to schedule a low vision evaluation. 
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Risk Factors for Macular Degeneration
[embed]https://youtu.be/VbWDUHarOLs[/embed] Macular degeneration is a condition characterised by retinal damage that can cause loss of central vision. Understanding what can cause AMD is very important to know if you are at risk for it because there are precautions that can be taken to avoid damage from AMD.

Family history

If you have an immediate family member with macular degeneration, it increases your risk of getting that condition as well. 

Race

Caucasians are at the greatest risk of developing AMD and going blind due to macular degeneration. One third of white people carry a gene related to macular degeneration, and those with light colored eyes are more likely to develop dry AMD.

Smoking

When you smoke, you definitely increase your chances of developing macular degeneration. 

UV rays

You may develop a variety of eye conditions including macular degeneration if you live in areas with bright sunlight and are out all the time. So it certainly doesn't help with the macula either. Essentially, our eyes are magnifiers themselves. When we are outside in the sun, our eyes magnify all that light into our eyes. In addition to having UV protection for light entering from the front of your glasses, it is actually important to also have protection on the back surface of your lenses. When we make glasses for our patients, especially sunglasses and clear glasses, we apply a UV coating to the back surface. It's easy to forget that there's still a lot of reflection coming from the back, which reflects back into our eyes.  If it comes from the back, it's not going to be filtered until we put on the backside coating.

Obesity

Research shows that someone who is obese is at a slightly increased risk of developing macular degeneration. However for someone with macular degeneration, the risks are much higher, as obesity has been shown to significantly increase the risk that earlier stages of macular degeneration will progress to later stages. Since later stages of macular degeneration leads to permanent vision loss, it is very important that someone who has macular degeneration is careful about managing their weight. 

Cardiovascular Disease

There is a high correlation between macular degeneration and heart disease with a major study in Taiwan that showed a significant association between the two. However scientific studies have not shown definitively whether there is a causal relationship between the two. 

Age 

Age is the biggest risk factor for macular degeneration, and the reason it is called Age Related Macular Degeneration. Typically, around the age of 60 is when we start to see signs of macular degeneration, but it doesn't mean that those signs cannot be apparent earlier or later than that. But on average, it usually happens around that age. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in adults over 60. Between ages 50 and 60, diabetic retinopathy is actually the leading cause of blindness.

Diet

A diet high in fish, eggs, and leafy green vegetables increases the amount of cartenoids found in the retina. These cartenoids, namely Lutein and Zeaxanthin, have been shown to reduce the progression of macular degeneration. For someone that has a diet that lacks these food groups in proper proportions, there may be an increased risk, especially if they have early stage macular degeneration.   

Eye doctor for Macular Degeneration in Los Angeles 

At Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach, we provide advanced medical eyecare for macular degeneration. Dr. Sarah Wolff is a residency trained low vision optometrist, and Dr. Eric Ikeda is a neuro optometrist helping patients following strokes or traumatic brain injury. When you schedule an eye exam for macular degeneration at our office, we will take the time to thoroughly examine your eyes and share ideas with you that are important in preventing eye disease. Call us at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] to schedule an eye exam today. 
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Telescopic Glasses for People with Low Vision
[embed]https://youtu.be/Xl3eaAw4Uaw[/embed] Magnification can be extremely beneficial for someone with vision loss from diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and other ocular conditions. When people think about magnification, they think about handheld magnifiers. However there are many options for magnification that provide additional benefits for certain people.  A handheld magnifying device can be difficult to hold for elderly people for long periods of time. If that is the case, your low vision optometrist may recommend high power reading glasses.  For some people high powered magnifying reading glasses can be uncomfortable as it requires holding the thing that you want magnified close to your eyes. For a lot of people, holding an object very close to their eyes is not very comfortable or makes their arms tired. 

What are telescopic glasses?

Telescopic reading glasses have two lenses that provide high magnification and these allow you to hold the material farther away. The two lenses allow you to hold the reading material further apart. When you read from a page with telescopic glasses, you can hold it back further in a similar way to when you are reading normally. The magnification is also adjustable. Despite their low magnification, they do provide a full range of view. These are similar to a pair of magnified reading glasses, but they use a different technology.

Are telescopic glasses effective for everyone?

The answer always depends on the task and the goal. Sometimes it's getting past the realization that one device may not work for every person and kind of recognizing that low vision devices have a range of vision. Therefore, when we see a patient at Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach, we are very goal-oriented and task-specific when it comes to our low vision evaluation. That enables us to provide the recommendation that best suits the lifestyle, visual needs, and visual ability of each individual. 

Why schedule a low vision exam at our Los Angeles Low Vision Clinic? 

Many people come to us after purchasing magnifiers online, only to realize that the product does not provide what the individual needs. At our practice, our residency trained low vision optometrist, Dr. Sarah Wolff, spends time with each patient to understand their visual goals and tasks that are most impacted by their vision. Then Dr. Wolff can better direct the patient to the appropriate low vision devices that can provide life changing visual improvement. For some patients a handheld magnifier is exactly what they need, while others will benefit more from magnified reading glasses, and yet others from telescopic glasses. There are a myriad of choices available today, from handheld devices, to glasses with magnification, to high-tech visual aids, our goal is to ensure that each patient walks out with the knowledge of what tools and devices can best help them.  Call us today at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] to schedule a low vision evaluation at Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach, located in Bellflower. 
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Low vision optometrists
[embed]https://youtu.be/GGy4xCc0r3c[/embed] Low vision optometrists are different from general optometrists. In both a comprehensive eye exam and a low vision evaluation, the focus of the eye exam is to figure out the patient's vision and how to help them see better. In addition both a low vision optometrist and a general care optometrist monitor the ocular health and provide relief from any visual discomfort.

The difference of a low vision optometrist is the solution 

For a routine care optometrist the solutions to help patients see better are pretty straight forward. Eyeglasses, contact lenses, and laser eye surgery are the standard correction methods used. However someone with low vision is not able to be helped with standard vision correction methods, and this is where the specialty of a low vision optometrist comes into play. In the case of someone who cannot see 100% with normal vision correction methods, it may be necessary to think outside of the box to think of ways to help them see better. Low vision optometrists do more than prescribe standard glasses; they perform tests beyond whether a patient can read a letter, or if they can discern certain contrasts. A low vision optometrist has undergone special training to understand the unique vision constraints of a low vision patient as well as the myriad of ever changing solutions that are available. Their primary job is to help guide the low vision patient on the best devices, optics, and tools that will allow the patient to achieve the most of their remaining vision. 

When someone is low vision, there is no one pair of glasses that gives them perfect vision

Many times patients with low vision, or a family member will call or visit our office in Bellflower and think that there is a simple solution to regain perfect vision. Unfortunately that is not the case. Each low vision device or optics will provide a solution for a specific focal distance and use case. For example for someone with macular degeneration who has lost some of their central vision the solution for reading (near distance) is not going to provide a good solution for driving (far distance).  Low vision optometrists are very interested in their patients' goals. There is no doubt that everyone wishes to see 20/20, but low vision optometrists are interested in what the patient struggles with the most and how to solve the most important things for each patient. Whether they want to read scores on TV more clearly or read the newspaper without difficulty, use the computer or drive, there are usually solutions for specific focal distances and situations. There is a lot more focus on the task at hand that patients find difficult to do because their vision isn’t perfect 20/20. In comparison to a regular eye exam, a comprehensive low vision exam is much more thorough and takes 2-3 times longer. In many cases a person with low vision will come in for more than one visit. 

Why is it important to spend more time with a low vision exam? 

During a low vision exam one of the goals is to educate the patient and their family members who accompany them about the specifics of their vision loss, the ways it may impact their life, and the many different resources, tools, devices, and optics that are available. Having guidance when you lose some of your vision is crucial to better coping with the changes

Our Low Vision Optometrist in Los Angeles

At Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach our residency trained low vision optometrist, Dr. Sarah Wolff, sees patients from the greater Los Angeles area who have vision loss. She is passionate about helping people with macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, stargardts, retinitis pigmentosa, best disease, strokes, and vision loss due to any other kind of eye disease. Dr. Wolff takes her time with each patient, assessing the remaining vision, helping the patient and their loved ones better understand the impact of the eye disease on their vision, assessing the patient's visual goals, and providing guidance on the best tools, magnification, lighting, glasses, and resources to help them achieve their visual goals. Call our office at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] to schedule a low vision exam.   
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Living with vision loss, tips and challenges
[embed]https://youtu.be/GM5748eig_Q[/embed]

Living with vision loss, tips and challenges from a Los Angeles Low Vision Optometrist

Those with low vision have a variety of challenges to overcome as they learn to live with their condition. Although diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent further loss of vision, there are steps you can take on your own to prevent injury,  regain independence, and make life more comfortable. In this blog Dr. Sarah Wolff, our residency trained low vision optometrist serving the greater Los Angeles low vision population shares some strategies. 

Increased contrast

One of the tips that are usually given to people who are just beginning to lose their vision, or even their family members who have a loved one who is losing their vision, is to use tools and tips to improve contrast. When a person starts to lose their vision from diseases such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataracts, retinitis pigmentosa, and other vision conditions, contrast sensitivity is often impacted.  It is much easier to see dark food on white plate than it is to see dark food on a dark plate. A white placemat makes it much easier to blue on cups, since it has a high contrast. It is also helpful when writing, if you use a darker type of pen on white paper, you can see the print a lot better than if you're using just a regular ballpoint pen. Similarly, a larger font will enable you to write and read a letter more easily and will not make you struggle as you would with a smaller font. Even though it may seem simple, it greatly reduces the difficulty of seeing it.

Contrast settings on electronic devices

If you're using a device, you can enhance the picture by adding colors since a white background is often very bright for someone with some vision loss. It can even be reversed to create a white lettering on a black background. Some people prefer yellow lettering on a black background. There are a lot of options to choose from there that you can play around with too, especially if you are new to vision loss. Keep in mind that every person's vision loss impacts their color contrast sensitivity differently, play around with the settings to see what makes it easier for you to see. 

Handheld magnifying lenses and magnifying glasses for vision loss

For someone with low vision, a magnifying lens is perhaps the most important tool, since it helps them read and do detail work. There are two primary types of magnification that can help a person with vision loss. The most well known kind of magnification is handheld magnification. The other is glasses that include more magnification. One of the major benefits of glasses with higher magnification is that it leaves the patients hands free. Furthermore they can be worn at all times or simply kept hanging from your neck like a pair of reading glasses. Many magnifiers have lights or glare-blocking filters. They come in different sizes and strengths. One of the roles of a low vision optometrist is to help the patient navigate the options and understand what type of magnification will help them achieve the best result visually and be best suited for their goals. 

Good lighting

It is imperative that people with low vision have plenty of light in their homes and any area where they spend time doing tasks that require great vision such as their dining room table, where they read, their desk, and at work. Brighter lighting can help someone with vision loss move freely and enjoy activities such as reading, sewing, playing cards, and much more. Whenever possible, open shades to let in natural light. For general lighting, look for overhead fixtures with strong bulbs and easy-to-access switches. During the evening hours, pay attention to dimly lit corners and stairs; motion-sensor nightlights will come in handy. Many patients love adjustable full spectrum stand lights that they can position near their reading area or anywhere where they need extra visual clarity. A low vision optometrist will help guide the patient on the best kind of lighting to meet their lifestyle and visual ability.   

Schedule a low vision exam in Los Angeles with Dr. Wolff, a residency trained low vision optometrist

Dr. Wolff has extensive experience and a passion for helping people with vision loss improve their vision, regain their independence, and enjoy the tasks that they loved before vision loss. Dr. Wolff works with every patient and their families to help them understand their vision loss better and navigate the myriad of options available to them to improve their vision. Schedule a low vision exam with Dr. Wolff today, call as at [mbv name="token-practice-phone"] today. 
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Testimonials


  • I haven't actually used the optometrist side, so my review is limited to the vision therapy offered.  This office was recommended by my occupational therapist for the treatment of my double vision following a stroke.


    Claire A.

  • Love this location. I had a brain injury accident from day one one. All the team make you feel you still important and hope in the horizon after when the medical system fell you miserably. Dr. Ikeda very professional and very understanding about your issue. Two tombs up.


    Jim K.

  • My husband and I were immediately impressed with Dr Ikeda. I was hit by a car while cycling which caused broken bones and three brain injuries. The brain injuries caused double vision. Dr. Ikeda examined my eyes and got me started on vision therapy with his occupational therapist who specializes in vision therapy.  She (Chris) is absolutely great.  I am impressed with the array of tools used to help recover my binocular vision.  I am doing things I never thought were possible (balance boards etc).  Chris pushes me and keeps me motivated. I really enjoy my sessions with her.  The office staff is always friendly and they have a wonderful appointment reminder tool that makes it easy to keep my calendar up to date. I am happy the rehab center at Little Co. of Mary recommended them!!


    Teresa S.

  • The Vision Therapy is handled in a separate office through a different door from the shared waiting room. Chris, the vision therapist, has a wide and varied assortment of tools, equipment and resources to best evaluate and treat most vision issues. After just a few visits, my double vision became easier to control, using exercises developed during the therapy process. It was time well-spent.


    Joe M.

  • I have been coming here since I can remember. I love it here. The staff is so amazing and nice. They explain everything they gonna do and never make you feel rushed. Dr. Ikeda has always been my doctor and I would never want another one. He is the doctor for my whole family and is always asking how everyone is doing. I am also so crazy about picking out my frames and have to try so many and each person who helps me take the time and lets me try them all on. I would never want to go anywhere else! I definitely would recommend this office to anyone looking for a great eye doctor.


    Kayla W.

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