Do You Know How a Brain Injury Could Affect Your Visual Skills?

The brain plays an extremely important role in the visual system, interpreting the information coming through your eyes. Injuries to the brain, and especially traumatic ones, can damage the important connections between the eyes and brain (even if the eyes themselves are not damaged), which may severely impact many crucial vision skills.

Do You Know How a Brain Injury Could Affect Your Visual Skills? in Bellflower

Amplify Eyecare of Greater Long Beach

What Constitutes a Traumatic Brain Injury?

Simply put, anything that does significant damage to the brain. This of course includes accidents, such as car crashes, but it also encompases more stricly medical trauma such as strokes. Traumatic brain injuries will not only impact the vision system, but can have wide-ranging impacts on many aspects of health.

Vision Often Overlooked

It’s not uncommon, when someone suffers a traumatic brain injury, for visual problems caused by the injury to be overlooked. If these vision issues aren’t detected and treated quickly, they can be much more difficult to treat later on and require a lengthier treatment period.

Vision Often Overlooked
Vision Skills Impacted by Traumatic Brain Injury

Vision Skills Impacted by Traumatic Brain Injury

There are numerous skills that go into the vision system enabling us to see properly. Many of these can be negatively impacted by a traumatic brain injury. Some of these can impact the mechanical functions of the eyes, while others are related strictly to the brain-eye connection through which information received by our eyes is interpreted by the brain.

  • Depth Perception: This is the ability for one to accurately judge the distances between objects, and how far away an object is.
  • Eye Tracking: Eye tracking is the ability of the eyes to smoothly move across a page while reading or to follow a moving object.
  • Peripheral Vision: Peripheral vision is essentially our side vision, what we see on the sides while looking straight ahead. The vision skill of peripheral vision is the ability to monitor and interpret what is in our field of vision.
  • Vision Perception: This is the general ability to quickly understand and process what we are seeing.
  • Fixation: The ability to accurately and quickly locate and inspect series of stationary objects (such as words on a page.)
  • Binocularity (eye tracking and teaming): This set of skills is what allows us to use our eyes together as an effective team.
  • Visualization: An often overlooked component of vision, this is what enables us to accurately picture an image in the “mind’s eye”, along with retaining and storing this information in our memory for future use.
  • Focus Change (accomodation): The ability to rapidly shift focus from far to near objects repeatedly.
  • Near Vision Acuity: The ability to clearly see, identify, inspect, and properly understand objects which are within arm’s length.
  • Distance Acuity: The ability to clearly see, identify, inspect, and properly understand objects which are far away.
  • Vision Perception: The ability to quickly process and understand what is being seen.
  • Maintaining Attention: The ability to maintain one’s focus on a specific activity despite nearby interference (such as noise or motion) is present.
Vision Skills Impacted by Traumatic Brain Injury

How Can Optometrists Help?

Since, unfortunately, many sectors of the healthcare world, including those that specialize in head trauma rehabilitation, aren’t properly aware of the vision-related problems that can result from a traumatic brain injury, there can be a major gap in available rehabilitative services.

Behavioral and developmental optometrists, who are specially trained to work with people who have suffered from a traumatic brain injury, can fill this gap in the rehabilitation services available.

Vision therapy and specialized lenses are among the methods used to help repair and improve the brain-eye connection for patients suffering from traumatic brain injury. They are also used to help improve the patient’s ability to visually process information.

What is the Treatment Process?

The first step will be a comprehensive eye exam. This will allow the optometrist to determine how the patient is currently processing visual information to get a sense of what issues need to be addressed.

Based on the exam’s findings, the optometrist will then prescribe a treatment regimen tailored to the patient’s individual needs. This can incorporate prisms, lenses, low vision aids, and activities specifically designed to help the patient improve control of their visual system and to increase their vision efficiency.

These treatments will help repair the damage done by the injury, and enable the patient to more comfortably engage in the daily activities they were able to do prior to the injury.

What Should I Do?

If you have experienced a traumatic brain injury and are suffering from vision-related problems, contact us to Book an Appointment for an evaluation.

Vision Often Overlooked
Dr. Ikeda cartoon

Summary

The brain plays a very important role in the vision system, and thus, traumatic brain injuries are likely to cause vision problems. While this is unfortunately overlooked by many medical professionals, behavioral and developmental optometrists are there to provide treatment to help patients repair the damage done, so they can return to the quality of life level they had prior to the injury.

Related Articles

Testimonials


  • I haven't actually used the optometrist side, so my review is limited to the vision therapy offered.  This office was recommended by my occupational therapist for the treatment of my double vision following a stroke.


    Claire A.

  • Love this location. I had a brain injury accident from day one one. All the team make you feel you still important and hope in the horizon after when the medical system fell you miserably. Dr. Ikeda very professional and very understanding about your issue. Two tombs up.


    Jim K.

  • My husband and I were immediately impressed with Dr Ikeda. I was hit by a car while cycling which caused broken bones and three brain injuries. The brain injuries caused double vision. Dr. Ikeda examined my eyes and got me started on vision therapy with his occupational therapist who specializes in vision therapy.  She (Chris) is absolutely great.  I am impressed with the array of tools used to help recover my binocular vision.  I am doing things I never thought were possible (balance boards etc).  Chris pushes me and keeps me motivated. I really enjoy my sessions with her.  The office staff is always friendly and they have a wonderful appointment reminder tool that makes it easy to keep my calendar up to date. I am happy the rehab center at Little Co. of Mary recommended them!!


    Teresa S.

  • The Vision Therapy is handled in a separate office through a different door from the shared waiting room. Chris, the vision therapist, has a wide and varied assortment of tools, equipment and resources to best evaluate and treat most vision issues. After just a few visits, my double vision became easier to control, using exercises developed during the therapy process. It was time well-spent.


    Joe M.

  • I have been coming here since I can remember. I love it here. The staff is so amazing and nice. They explain everything they gonna do and never make you feel rushed. Dr. Ikeda has always been my doctor and I would never want another one. He is the doctor for my whole family and is always asking how everyone is doing. I am also so crazy about picking out my frames and have to try so many and each person who helps me take the time and lets me try them all on. I would never want to go anywhere else! I definitely would recommend this office to anyone looking for a great eye doctor.


    Kayla W.

Blog

Lighting-Assessment---Intensity-1

Lighting as Part of A Low Vision Evaluation

A low vision evaluation is in some ways similar to a regular eye exam, and in other ways entirely different. […]

Read More
josh-applegate-p_KJvKVsH14-unsplash

Can ADD/ADHD be a Vision Problem?

According to a study, approximately 20% of 4.5 million children currently identified as having ADHD may have been misdiagnosed. Furthermore […]

Read More
pexels-monstera-6186146

Are all magnifiers the same? The difference in optics between handheld magnifiers

Hand magnifiers are hand-held devices that can be placed over an object or text to enlarge or magnify what you […]

Read More
see all blogs

Contact Us To Amplify Your EyeCare

Amplify EyeCare of Greater Long Beach Logo

Working Hours

Monday & Wednesday
9:00AM–6:00PM

Tuesday & Thursday
8:00AM–5:00PM

Saturday
By appointment only

Friday & Sunday
Closed

 

 

Location
16816 Clark Ave, Bellflower, CA 90706, United States
Fax
(562) 867-8719
Website Accessibility Policy
Safety protocols page
privacy policy
Cancellation Policy
For Patients
appointment
Call Us
Referrals
Assessments
For Patients
appointment
Call Us
Referrals
Assessments
eyefile-adduserphone-handsetcalendar-fullarrow-uparrow-right linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram